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Lotus Garden

Yeah, yeah, I know, Mists is so two expansions ago. Nonetheless, the Golden Lotus Tabard is one of my favorites not just from Pandaria, but from all the available tabards.

Serene Lotus

Crown of the Fire Festival, Replica Virtuous shoulders robe & belt, Exiled Dabbler’s Gloves, Drape of the Twins, Golden Lotus tabard
This is the blindingly obvious outfit for a cloth-wearer to use with this tabard.

Glowing Lotus

Lawbringer Armor with Sunsoul Helm, Dawnsteel Shoulders, Drape of the Twins, The Willbreaker, Don Carlos’ Drifting Shield, and Golden Lotus tabard
This kit is exceedingly class specific — but the idea for it is one of the main reasons why I farmed up the Lawbringer Armor. It’s just taken me forever to get around to actually making the outfit…
This shield appeared in Cataclysm, but its design has always seemed quite Oriental Pandarian to me.

Vision Lotus

Crusader’s Pauldrons, Dreamwalker Armor, Triumphant Girdle, Emberweave Leggings, Ornate Gauntlets & Greaves, Cloak of Tranquil Clouds, Mace of Serenity, Talador Spellbarrier, Golden Lotus tabard
Although it would have been very easy to make this kit all golden, it needed some silver in it to harmonize with the white of the tabard.

Zen Lotus

Whisper Jerkin, Vine Waistband, Bluegill Breeches*, Runesworn Grips, Griftah’s Authentic Troll Shoes, Cloak of Tranquil Clouds, Golden Saronite Dragon, Golden Lotus tabard
It took a couple of weeks of planting Enigma Seeds and harvesting & replanting anything that wasn’t a Golden Lotus to get a garden completely full of them.

Upon teleporting back to the Hall of the Guardian to put some new traits into Aluneth and Felo’melorn after doing some questing in Suramar, Kaelinda observed something odd…

When she went to investigate, the portal to Suramar had an unusual green glow around it. She hadn’t used the portal to Suramar yet, so she was curious to see where it would go anyway. (I forgot to take a screenshot of the green glow before I clicked it, though.)

It didn’t go to Suramar.

Apparently she was somewhere in Frostfire Ridge? On Draenor?

What a strange experience…

I’m not particulary keen on this appearance (or any of Ebonchill’s appearances, really), but now I am reminded that I should take some time to go get the Hidden appearance for Aluneth. Hopefully the Hidden appearance for Felo’melorn will just drop while I’m working my way through the Suramar storyline and I won’t have to come back and grind for it.

I’ve got a couple of other things to do in Suramar besides the zone storyline itself that I think I’ll clear up before I continue much farther in the mainline questchain. I need to go visit that tailoring guild guy in Suramar City, and I’ve got a Mage Order Hall Campaign quest to make some trouble in Felsoul Hold with Kalec.

This week we have the end of one series, the continuation of another, and a standalone.

Professor of Potions

Fel-Proof Goggles, Duskhallow Mantle, Silver-Thread Robe, Ivycloth Sash, Fel-Infused Grips, Sorcerer Slippers, Warmonger’s Cloak, Green Martial Shirt, Arakkoa Divining Rod, Flask of Forest Mojo*
This is my “Severus Snape” outfit.
The combination of the sleeveless Silver-Thread Robe with a Martial Shirt produces a deeper black overall appearance than the nearly identical, sleeved Black Velvet Robe would.
The only still-available item with the same model as the Flask of Forest Mojo is the Tears of Heaven.
I didn’t include a hat in the original design because Snape doesn’t wear one. I initially thought about using a black hood to mimic Snape’s hair. Goggles are better, though. These gloves are better, too. Really, the lack of proper personal protective equipment in the Hogwarts potions labs is quite appalling…

Fel-Etched Soul

Spaulders of the Unseen, Nightglaive’s Vest, Eighty Silver Links, Blackfathom Leggings, Inscribed Leather Gloves + Illidari Bracers, Sablehide Footwraps, Fel-Etched Glaive
Kiralaira’s previous outfit, which I made to go with the glaives that a newly-created Demon Hunter begins with, looked equally good with these glaives that have been acquired by the end of the starting zone experience. I wanted to make a new and different kit, though, and after a little fiddling around, I came up with this. I liked how the pattern of the contrast color straps on the pants echoes on her legs the pattern of the tattoos on her arms. Then the rest of it was finding other items that were the right sorts of colors to blend into a coherent overall look.

Barkskin

Eternal Blossom Shoulderwraps, Robes of Eighty Lights, Thatch Eave Vines, Ranger Gloves
The bark-and-fur look of this armor nicely complements the appearance of the Claws of Ursoc, and the colors perfectly complement the Fangs of Ashamane.
I am quite amused by how the Hood of Stilled Winds that is part of this set looks like a bear mask —

— but I like seeing my characters’ faces too much to actually ever wear it.
Although I did play Kerisa as herself to collect the Guardian Artifact, she’s never been really comfortable with being a bear. So for this Guardian spec kit, I’ve given her the alter-ego appearance of my secondary Druid, Kaiuna, who was created to play with the melee Druid specs.

~*~*~

This series of posts began because I set myself a goal to document new Transmogrification outfits in a more timely fashion. As soon as I create a new outfit, I write it up in a draft post. As the weekend approaches, I start working on taking fashion screenshots, processing them, and updating “Things my [Class] Wears” posts. On Sunday — though not every Sunday — I publish the collection of my recent efforts. Then I begin the next “Sunday on the Promenade” draft post.

Occasionally, I have ideas for themed Transmogrification collections that take several months to completely assemble. Thus, some of these outfits might get re-posted at a later date as part of such a themed Transmogrification collection.

If any of you, my dear readers, have kits that you’d like to share, I’d be happy to add you to the show! Just email me your picture(s), along with a list of the items in the outfit. I don’t regularly check my blog email, though, so if you’ve sent me an outfit, please make a comment on the most recent Sunday Mog Show post so that I know to check my blog email for your contribution.

Kamalia’s forays into Suramar were scattered and disorganized, and I felt like I’d done a few things out of order. When Kaelinda reached level 110, I resolved to go through Suramar with her much more carefully and methodically.

I tackled the introductory questlines one or two in a sitting. First, meeting Thalyssra and discovering what Kel’danath had been up to with the Withered. Next, meeting Occuleth and Valtrois. Finally, going into the city to meet the Lunastres and bringing the arcan’dor seed to Shal’aran.

I liked Occuleth the best of the three lead Nightfallen characters when I finally got around to meeting him with Kamalia. After doing the introduction to Suramar again with Kaelinda, I still like Occuleth the best. He’s such a hoopy frood. I really enjoyed the puzzle-game feeling of his workshop — figuring out where all the teleporters go and which sites are connected — and the amazing views of the zone and the city from each of his cliffside terraces.

The next step, before going too much deeper into Suramar City, was to activate all the leyline feeds.

Now, what should I do next?
I see exclamation points on my map for Jandvik, Tel’Anor, Moon Guard, Irongrove Retreat, and Felsoul Hold, so I can probably just go do those side-quest areas without waiting/needing to get breadcrumbs for them from Thalyssra. But I also know that there are two other quests in Felsoul Hold and one quest near Crimson Thicket that aren’t showing up on the map… maybe I should wait to get breadcrumbs for those from Thalyssra?
Or should I focus on doing the main storyline in the City, and leave the side-quest areas for later?
I should at least go do Jandvik so that those vrykul will be friendly the next time I have to run through their town on my way to Occuleth’s undersea survey.

Kaelinda dinged 109 doing profession quests at the Darkmoon Faire last Sunday. I didn’t feel like she’d really done very much Legion stuff yet, so where did all that XP come from?

Hmm… she did all of Val’sharah. She did the first chapter in Azsuna and the first two chapters in Stormheim. She did her Mage order hall stuff at level 103 and got all of her Artifacts. She did the Exodar scenario. She did the Tailoring questline up until she got the first quest to go into a dungeon. She picked some flowers — aethril, dreamleaf, fjarnskaggl — and did the first quests for those herbs. And oh yeah, she did a couple of the bonus objective areas in Azsuna while working on the Tailoring and Mage questchains. So I guess that’s quite a bit of Broken Isles stuff, after all. But did she really get almost all of the rest of that XP from doing the Thunder Bluff and Old Dalaran fising dailies until she got the Jeweled Fishing Pole?!

Seeing that Kaelinda was so close to level 110, on Thursday night I decided to go questing with her instead of starting the Legionfall campaign with Kamalia or taking someone to the Thousand Boat Bash. She started by going to Azurewing Repose to help the blue dragons.

At Azurewing Repose, Kaelinda was nearly overcome by the raw, unfiltered mana radiating from the fully exposed ley line.

It had been challenging to break free of the addiction to the flow of mana from the Sunwell, that addiction that she hadn’t even known that she had until the Sunwell was destroyed… She had managed it eventually, sooner even than many Sin’dorei, despite — or perhaps because of — being a Mage and interacting with and shaping mana more frequently and intimately than those with other careers. Once, some years ago, she had gone to the Exodar in Human disguise; she had rapidly fallen into a daze from the haze of mana in the atmosphere there. She had thought, at the time, that she had mastered the addiction, and she had been somewhat ashamed of herself for succumbing so easily. This… this was a hundredfold… maybe a thousandfold more potent and difficult to resist. She struggled to stay focused and clear-headed. It would have been so blissful to just lie down in those shimmering pools, resting her head on the shore, like soaking in a nice hot bath, and dream for awhile.

It didn’t help that Aluneth kept greedily siphoning up the energy.

She had a great deal of empathy for Runas, because he reminded her of those first terrible weeks after the destruction of the Sunwell.

He also frightened her, because he reminded her of what she could have become if she hadn’t been able to begin recovering from the addiction as soon and as well as she did. She was both fascinated and horrified by her introduction to the Nightborne elves at Zarkhenar.

Completing the Azurewing Repose storyline got her over halfway from 109 to 110. That was also a good stopping point, so I continued on Friday.

After she had helped them defeat the Nightborne attack, the dragons sent Kaelinda to meet a ghostly Prince of the ancient Highborne elves, saying that he would be able to help her obtain the Tidestone of Golganneth. Kaelinda had spent many years studying what was known of the Highborne, so she was keenly interested — excited, to tell the truth — to learn about them more directly.

Kaelinda wondered what the rest of the Starlance family’s story was. Where had the children been, that they were not in Nar’thalas when Azshara cursed the city? What careers had Kallistia and Olothil pursued before they decided to become Mages? Or had they been Mages all along, hiding in Eldre’thalas? How had they remained so juvenile youthful over ten thousand years?

Nar’thalas Academy… I loved this place the first time I came through, with Kamalia, and I loved it just as much the second time through. I’ll have to get Kaelinda the Key to its past the next time that Archaeology quest comes up.

Kaelinda continued on and finished the zone after she dinged. The abrupt change of heart of the denizens of Nar’thalas toward their Prince stymied Kaelinda somewhat. For ten thousand years, Farondis’ subjects had hated him for what his defiance of Queen Azshara had cost them. Yet when Azshara confronted Farondis and dangled before him the hope of releasing his people from their curse, he defied her again… and now they suddenly respected him again?

It didn’t seem to make any sense. Could it have been because the revelation that Azshara was behind the Naga made them realize that Farondis cared for them and Azshara did not? And they’d rather be ghosts with a Prince who cared than properly alive (or dead?) with a Queen who didn’t? Or had they entirely misunderstood what Farondis had done and why — for ten thousand years? She would have to spend more time with the Court of Farondis, learning their personalities, history, and culture, to understand this thing.

Of course, Kaelinda was showered with things to do as soon as she returned to Dalaran and her Order Hall. Do World Quests! Go to Suramar! Take the Tear of Elune to Light’s Heart! Continue the Mage campaign! Go to the Broken Shore! I was surprised that she got pushed the Legionfall opening quest — I thought that she would have to complete the 7.0 Order Hall campaign first. She also needs to run the Eye of Azshara dungeon both to get the Tidestone and for her Tailoring quest. Because it was World Quests bonus week, I did World Quests — all the Emissaries that came up, plus a few extras to get to twenty. I had Kamalia send to Kaelinda the Artifact Knowledge catch-up thingy to get her to AK 20; then she spent most of the Order Resources she acquired from WQing to get to AK 25. She very quickly accumulated enough Artifact Power to fill up Aluneth from a handful of traits up to 20-some-odd. I think this AK/AP catch-up mechanism for alts works quite nicely!

So now I will be asking myself each evening: Suramar with Kaelinda, or Legionfall with Kamalia? Or be lazy and just do Emissary World Quests? 😛

By the time Kamalia got all of her Artifacts to 35 traits in mid-February, I was so ready to be done with World Quests. I went off and rattled around in legacy content, merrily bullying old raid bosses for their pocket change (seriously, Nefarian, just give my Priest her robe, okay?). After awhile, that began to get boring, but I wasn’t quite ready to jump back into Legion content, either — I couldn’t quite bring myself to do endgame stuff with Kam, nor could I quite bring myself to go level with any of my alts.

Now, though, the Legionfall campaign is fully unlocked. People are getting their class mounts and parading them around the streets of Dalaran.

I’m sure I will eventually do all the class mount quests for the stories. After seeing them in action, the class mounts that I’m most excited about getting, the ones that will get their own space on my characters’ action bars, are the Rogue raven and the Mage disc. The Paladin horse, Priest owl-gryphon, Monk tiger, and Warlock demonsteed will go into those characters’ mount macros. The others may not ever get used at all.

Now I can start the Legionfall campaign and progress through it at a rate limited only by my ability to complete the quests in a timely fashion. Plus, it’s World Quest bonus week. I skipped the last couple of those because I wasn’t doing anything with Order Resources. I wasn’t even running missions using the mobile app. I’ll need Order Resources again once I get started on the Legionfall stuff, though. This seems like a good time to come back to Legion content.

So I started doing World Quests again the other day, just enough to complete my Emissary quests, and lo and behold, what should fall out of the Suramar cache but my second Legion Legendary!

I got my first Legion Legendary, the equally generic and even more lackluster Sephuz’s Secret, from a Suramar Emissary cache, too. So I guess I should keep doing those Suramar Emissary quests, and maybe one of these days I’ll get a Legion Legendary that’s class & spec specific.

This fortnight’s topic from Z & Cinder’s Blog Challenge is a perennial favorite of the altoholic:

Making a new character in WoW can be one of the most fun things to do; you get to pick a new appearance and maybe a new class and there’s the anticipation of going to see all the low leveling zones again.. but first you have to name your new toon.
How do you come up with character names?
Is there a particular naming convention you follow? Do you like your toon name to reflect on their class fantasy? Does their name set their personality for you? And most of all… do you ever get stuck just staring at that pick your name box???

My primary rule of naming my characters is that I name them as if they were real people.
Occasionally, I choose names that are deliberately punny, but the puns are relatively subtle.

My naming convention — all of my characters’ names begin with “K” and the names of characters who belong to the “one of each Class” set must also end with “a” — arose somewhat spontaneously. If I’m remembering the way things happened mostly correctly (and not as a tall tale), by coincidence, the names I chose for my first three or four characters all began with “K”, and it was after I noticed that I’d done that serendipitously that I decided to continue doing it deliberately.

I wrote about how I name my characters during the first year of this blog’s existence. The origins of most of my characters’ names are explained in that previous post, so I won’t go over them again in this one. The inspirations for those names came from the gamut of sources — and sometimes I did get stuck staring at the name box and hitting the “randomize” button until it generated something I thought I could change around a bit and live with.

A few of my characters’ names have shifted since they were originally created due to server transfers — Kjersti became Kjerstin, Karelia became Karaelia, Kiraleia the Blood Elf Paladin became Kyraleia the Dwarf Paladin.

When I changed the identity of my Human Mage to be an Alliance surrogate for my Blood Elf Mage (who sometimes wishes that she were still a High Elf), I gave her a new name that is essentially identical to my Blood Elf Mage’s name, just with a couple of the vowels shifted to “y”s: Kaelinda/Kaylynda.

I’ve created several new characters since I wrote that post nearly seven years ago, so I’ll tell you about how I came up with those characters’ names.

My Orc Shaman’s name was “Keshona”; when I created my Orc Mage and decided that the Mage was the Shaman’s mother, I named the mage “Kenosha”, a rearrangement of the consonants in the other name (and also a town in Wisconsin).

My Pandaren Mage is “Kaoling” because I wanted to name her “kaolin”, the word for the specific type of clay used to make Chinese porcelain, but that name was already taken.

I don’t remember exactly how I came up with “Khrissalys” for my Dwarf Mage, other than that I began with the “Kris” syllable and iterated the rest of the name until I was happy with the result, a combination of “Kris” and “Alice”. I like the way it sounds like “chrysalis”, too.

I renamed my Goblin Mage from “Kazuliza” to “Kermione” (a name I originally used for a Goblin Shaman) because I just couldn’t resist how perfect the portmanteau of “Kermit” and “Hermione” is for a Goblin Mage.

I still wanted to use “z” in a name, so then I ended up with “Kazithra”, a slightly sinister sounding name for a Grimtotem Shadow Priest. This character was originally a separate alt, but now exists as an alter-ego of my primary Priest.

At the same time that I created a secondary Tauren Priest alt, I also created a secondary Tauren Paladin alt. I named this character “Kishalla”; the “shall” syllable is inspired by the character Shallan in Brandon Sanderson’s Stormlight Archive. I later recycled the “Kishalla” name for, ironically, an Affliction/Demonology alter-ego for my Warlock.

Kamalia’s parents’ names, “Kehontah” and “Kawneiha”, come from playing with syllables and trying to come up with something that fit the Native American pastiche tone of Tauren culture.

My secondary Shaman, commonly known as “mini-Kam”, is formally “Kamalita” — literally “little Kamalia”.

The Underpowered Death Knight’s name started out as “Kaumalea”, which is deliberately, but obscurely, punny: “kau” is like “cow”, and “mal” is the Latin for “bad/evil”, thus, “bad cow”. Later, I changed the final syllable to “leia” because I wanted a Tauren with that ending syllable. When I draw the Underpowered Death Knight, I coil the long braids hairstyle that she uses in-game up into Princess Leia’s iconic cinnamon buns.

My Monk, Katewatha, got her name because I wanted to have a Tauren whose name shortened to “Kate” and because I wanted to use the letter “w” in another Tauren name. Searching for syllables that sounded okay together, the second half of her name ended up being the same as the name of BTH’s male Tauren Warrior who was my Druid’s leveling companion through level 80 (then BTH decided he didn’t enjoy Warriors and abandoned that alt).

My secondary Monk began her life as “Koralyra” (“coral” as a rearrangement of “carol”, plus “lyra”), a name I had previously invented for a short-lived Dwarf alt and liked enough to use again. Late in Warlords, I changed her name to “Kaobeka”, an anagram of “Akabeko” of Red Cow Rise. I’d actually already been using the name “Kaobeka” for a secondary Warrior alt, but I decided to delete that alt when the news of how specs would work in Legion came out. Besides, I thought that it was more fitting to name a Monk after Akabeko the Druid than a Warrior. When I recently decided to start using that secondary Warrior’s appearance as an alter-ego for Kregga, I retconned her name to “Kaobeqa” so as not to be an exact name-duplicate of Kaobeka the Monk (also, I wanted to use “q” in a name).

My most recent new character, the Demon Hunter, was originally going to reuse the “Koralyra” name. That didn’t quite feel right for her when I put it into the name box, though, so I shifted “lyra” to the “laira” that was the ending of my long-ago Blood Elf Death Knight’s name. Then it seemed better to shift “Kora” to “Kira”, the beginning of my long-ago Blood Elf Paladin’s name. “Kiralaira” felt much better for her both because it flows in a more Sin’dorei sort of way and because it recalls my two earlier characters.

Looking over the names I’ve chosen, they tend to reflect more on the racial identity of my characters than on their class identity. If I’m naming my characters as real people that makes sense — their racial identity has been part of them since they were born and their parents named them, whereas their class identity came to them later in their life.